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FloridaGardener's Blog
Author: host Created: 4/16/2009 7:27 PM
What's the FloridaGardener doing in his garden? Check it and see!

By host on 6/24/2009 9:06 PM

Smart StoneLooking for a weekend DIY project? Need a quick and easy stone garden path? An alternative to heavy, expensive natural stones or cement? Try Smart StoneTM made by Greenland CompositesTM, Inc. Smart Stones measure approximately 17"L x 15"W x 2"H and come colored in gray or brown.

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By host on 6/22/2009 9:39 PM

Pachydiplax longipennis, Blue Pirate, Blue Dasher, Swift Long-winged Skimmer Dragonfly

First of all, despite what you might have been told or come to think -- Odonate dragonflies are completely harmless - they do not sting or bite. Indeed, they are beneficial insects because they eat large quantities of small flying insects – particularly mosquitoes.

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By host on 6/21/2009 5:51 PM

Standard Rose and Orange JasmineStandards are shrubs or vines that are pruned and trained into a tree form that has a single stem. Standards were a popular horticultural technique in Victorian times and are still also quite popular in European gardens. Commonly called “standard trees” or even topiaries -- bougainvillea, eugenia, hibiscus, oleander, orange jasmine, roses and rosemary are some of the plants most often trained into standards for Florida gardens.

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By host on 6/18/2009 11:01 PM

Mealybug Destroyer Cryptolaemus montrouzieri – a Predator in DisguiseI was working in my garden this evening putting in a new plant that I bought from TopTropicals.com (a true tea bush – Camellia  sinensis) when I passed by my Gardenia bush and saw what at first looked like some sort of little fuzzy white caterpillar. What the heck is that I wondered? I Read More »

By host on 6/17/2009 9:38 PM

A clutch of Mockingbird eggsUniversity of Florida biologists are reporting that mockingbirds recognize and remember people whom the birds perceive as threatening their nests. If the white-and-grey songbirds common in cities and towns throughout the Southeast spot their unwelcome guests, they screech, dive bomb and even sometimes graze the visitors’ heads — while ignoring other passers-by or nearby strangers.

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By host on 6/15/2009 10:10 PM

NOAA Public Domain Lighting Strike Key Colony BeachThese are the facts: 1) Florida is the thunderstorm capital of the United States; 2) The "lightning belt" in Florida is an area from between Orlando and Tampa to south along the west coast to Fort Myers and east to Lake Okeechobee; 3) Florida leads the nation in lightning strikes and deaths; and 4) April, May and June are the peak months for lightning in Florida.

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By host on 6/14/2009 9:28 PM

Ichneumon WaspIchneumon (pronounced ik-new-mon) Wasps, often inaccurately called "Ichneumon Flies", are members of the hymenoptera family (which includes wasps, bees and ants) and are parasitic wasps. Parasitic wasps are considered beneficial to humans because they control populations of destructive agricultural pests such as aphids, beetles, caterpillars, flies, sawflies, scale insects and true bugs...

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By host on 6/11/2009 10:11 PM

Tendergreen Improved Sting BeansCommon beans, green beans, snap beans, string beans and wax beans are all members of the Fabaceae/Leguminosae (bean Family). In Florida bush beans are a great vegetable plant to grow during the summer.

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By host on 6/6/2009 11:26 PM

A Garden Room at VizcayaSome gardens have a simple certain something: Some radiate harmony and peace, others are mysterious and full of surprises. The rules of the organization behind the designs are simple…

Do like the professionals do and you can transform your garden into a special oasis.

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By host on 6/3/2009 10:16 PM

Hardy Perennial HibiscusI just received some seeds that I ordered from Onalee’s Home-Grown Seeds in Brooksville, FL. They are Hardy Perennial Hibiscus seeds. They're easily grown if you give them the conditions they want (in fact, they're easily grown in most conditions), i.e. they do very well in full sun/part shade and san Read More »

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