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FloridaGardener's Blog
May 8

Written by: host
5/8/2010 9:12 PM

I have a flower bed in the front yard that receives full sun after about twelve o’clock noon and faces west. Since this garden bed is before the front of the house, it is shaded from sun in the east until the latter part of the day.

I like to use this area for seasonal flowers. This year after I weeded it out and prepared the soil I “seasoned” it with a few shakes from a can of “Ferry-Morse Easy Shaker Garden Fun And Easy Wildflower Mix” seeds. Now finally the seeds are coming up and beginning to bloom.

Below is a picture of three species of flower from the mix that have started blooming. Two of them have a very light honey-sweet, yet musky scent that is especially noticeable particularly in the early morning when the air temperature is still relatively cool. While not having large flowers, they look especially good when growing together en-mass.

From left to right are the flowers of Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia Maritima), Virginia Stock (Malcolmia Maritima), and Scarlet Flax (Linum Grandiflorum Rubrum). Click to enlarge.


From left to right are the flowers of Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia Maritima), Virginia Stock (Malcolmia Maritima), and Scarlet Flax (Linum Grandiflorum Rubrum). Both the Sweet Alyssum and Virginia Stock are members of the family Brassicaceae which includes mustard and cabbage plants.

On the other hand Scarlet Flax produces flax seed that is used to produce linseed oil. This species is a close relative of the flax used to produce linen. (Note both “linen” and “linseed” derives from botanical name, Linum). I think this flower is in the wildflower mix for its brilliant scarlet color as I do not find the flowers to have a scent.

Below is a shot of Spurred Snapdragon, also known as Toadflax (Linaria Moroccana). This is another flower that I think is included in the mix for its colors (rainbow-like) and shape as it has no noticeable scent. Interestingly the botanical name of this flower refers to its resemblance to the Flax plant (Linaria) and its origin in the desert regions of North Africa (Moroccana).
Spurred Snapdragon, also known as Toadflax (Linaria Moroccana). Click to enlarge.


All of these plants are pretty happy in bright sunny areas with well drained soil. They are annuals, which means that they will bloom for the season, produce seed, then die. The seeds are fertile so these plants self sow themselves, which means that they should sprout from the dropped seeds to give a show in your flower bed in following blooming seasons.


Happy Gardening!

FG

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